Monday, December 26, 2011

Monday Morning Marketing Tip - Top Tips of 2011

This week's focus:

2011 Year in ReviewI hope you had a Merry Christmas! This week, we're looking back over 2011 and revisiting some of the more popular Monday Morning Marketing Tips from this year based on subscriber feedback. In case you missed them or would like a refresher, here's a list to those marketing tips:


Use the Snowball Approach to Build Your Platform


Are You Prepared for a Hail Mary Marketing Moment


Passive versus Proactive Marketing


Monitor Your Amazon Reviews


Top 10 Misconceptions Authors Believe about Marketing



I look forward to kicking off the New Year next week as we'll discuss:

"Your Top 12 Marketing Moves for 2012."




Coming Next Month: New Teleconference Series for Authors

Advanced Book Marketing - Teleconference Join me in January for the start of new instructional teleconference series called, "Advanced Book Marketing for Authors." Learn the essential skills that every fiction and non-fiction author needs to market books more effectively. Plus, I'll personally answer your questions during these sessions. The first session will be on Wednesday, January 18th and I'll explain "How to Answer the Most Important Question in Book Marketing." All teleconference sessions will be recorded and sent as a download file afterwards. So, you can listen live or listen later on your computer, iPod, or smartphone.

Register early and save 20%. Click here for details and signup.


Holiday Special for my Newsletter Subscribers:

Non-Fiction Marketing Plan TemplateTo say thanks for subscribing to my Monday Morning Marketing Tips, I'm offering a $5.00 discount (20% off) on any of my downloadable teaching products between now and December 31st. Just use the secret code "wildfire" when you checkout at my website. Get a great deal on these resources for authors:

Bestseller Website Tutorial - Fiction and Non-Fiction versions

Marketing Plan Template for Authors - Fiction and Non-Fiction

How to Sell Books in Any Market - 5 hours of audio teaching



Thursday, December 22, 2011

Guest Blogger at Writer's Digest: What Makes Word-of-Mouth Work - Part 2

I'm guest blogging today over at Writers Digest. Check out my article:

"What Makes Word-of-Mouth Work: Part 2"

Click here - http://goo.gl/x3C1V

Monday, December 19, 2011

Monday Morning Marketing Tip - "Put on Your Marketing Glasses"


Rob Eagar's Monday Morning Marketing Tip
is written to help authors, publishers, and organizations
spread their message like wildfire.

This week's focus:

Last week, we had unseasonably warm weather in Atlanta for December (70 degrees!). So, I took advantage and went mountain biking one afternoon after work before the sun went down. However, as dusk set in, the light began to fade and the trail became harder to see. Anticipating this issue, I pulled out a pair of orange-tinted glasses that I had brought with me. As I looked through these glasses, I was struck by the change that happened. Within seconds, I went from straining to see the trail to seeing everything around me with bright, clear vision. It felt like someone suddenly turned on the lights, and my ability to continue biking became much easier. Even though the sunlight had not changed, my perspective was enhanced by wearing the colored glasses.

This situation represents a marketing perspective that affects all authors. No, I'm not going to make the sappy suggestion that wearing rose-colored glasses is the solution to life's problems. But, my mountain biking experience represents an important reminder for authors who are trying to promote their books. When you look at your readers through "value-colored" glasses, your marketing strategy will be much easier to see. In other words, if you concentrate on providing value and helping to entertain or inform your readers, your path will be easier to follow and you'll reach your destination faster.

For example, your newsletters will yield better results when write articles that tangibly help your subscribers. Your website and social media activities will be more productive when you give away free advice, resources, and samples. Your book sales will grow when you view readers as individuals who need answers and inspiration, rather people who should buy something from you.

As you analyze your marketing efforts, look at the process through the lens of helping people and providing value. The view may not always be rosy, but your next step as a book marketer will be much easier to see.


Coming Next Month: New Teleconference Series for Authors

Join me in January for the start of new instructional teleconference series called, "Advanced Book Marketing for Authors." Learn the essential skills that every fiction and non-fiction author needs to market books more effectively. Plus, I'll personally answer your questions during these sessions. The first session will be on Wednesday, January 18th and I'll explain "How to Answer the Most Important Question in Book Marketing." All teleconference sessions will be recorded and sent as a download file afterwards. So, you can listen live or listen later on your computer, iPod, or smartphone.

Register early and save 20%. Click here for details and signup.



Special Christmas Discount for My Blog Readers:


To say "thank you" to my blog readers this year, I'm offering a $5.00 discount (that's 25% off) on any of my new downloadable teaching products between now and December 31st. Just use the secret code "wildfire" when you checkout at my website. Get a great deal on these new resources for authors:


Bestseller Website Tutorial - Fiction and Non-Fiction versions
Marketing Plan Template for Authors - Fiction and Non-Fiction
How to Sell Books in Any Market - 5 hours of audio teaching


Remember, use "wildfire" in the discount code box when you checkout to get the discount. Applies to downloadable products only (PDF, Word, and mp3 files).


Merry Christmas and thanks for following my blog!





To receive Rob's Monday Morning Marketing Tips directly in your email inbox,
click here



© Rob Eagar 2011.
All rights reserved.






Thursday, December 15, 2011

Guest Blog Post at Writer's Digest: "What Makes Word-of-Mouth Work?"

I'm guest blogging today over at Writers Digest. Check out my article:

"What Makes Word-of-Mouth Work?"

Click here - http://goo.gl/JB6Nl

Monday, December 12, 2011

Monday Morning Marketing Tip - December 12, 2011


Rob Eagar's Monday Morning Marketing Tip
is written to help authors, publishers, and organizations
spread their message like wildfire.

This week's focus:
My wife, Ashley the Wonderful, is a voracious reader. She can easily go through a book a week, and she enjoys referring her favorite books to friends. Last week, she made a statement that stopped me in my tracks - and it should stop any author in their tracks as well. She said:


"Readers don't give grace when they give money for a book."


Her remark touches on a common problem that I've noticed among a lot of authors, especially first-timers and self-published types. Too many authors expect readers to give them grace when their book is poorly written, badly edited, or cheap-looking. They expect readers to graciously "look past" those problems and credit them with a good book anyway. Last week, an author confessed to me, "I've expected readers to excuse the 'homemade' nature of my work. I know it's shoddy, but why can't people overlook those issues?"


Friends, that's not how the publishing business works. If you want people to pay money for your book, don't expect them to give grace if your book is substandard. People expect professionalism, because they're paying for it. When someone gives you money, a financial transaction takes place, which makes you a professional. Amateurs work for free. Pros make money.


If you want people to give you grace, then offer your book for free. Don't expect people to give you their hard-earned cash if you don't want to act like a professional. The reading public expects books that cost money to come from a professional author. Think about it. You put the same expectations on the professionals in your life that you pay, such as doctors, dentists, hairdressers, and fitness instructors. You don't give them grace if they do a substandard job. Likewise, it's no different for authors.


I know that some of you reading this are stay-at-home moms, non-profit workers, counsellors, and part-time teachers. Those are all admirable callings. But, if you expect to receive payment for your books, you immediately become a business-person. Therefore, your book must be written, produced, and sold at a professional level. Otherwise, you're just a hobbyist who shouldn't expect any income.


If you want people to buy your books, don't expect them to give you grace for second-rate writing, editing, or layout. People want their money's worth. So, give readers what they deserve...a well-written book that provides tangible value in return.


If you still want grace for substandard performance, talk to God - amazing grace is his specialty.



Special Christmas Discount for My Blog Readers:


To say "thank you" to my blog readers this year, I'm offering a $5.00 discount (that's 25% off) on any of my new downloadable teaching products between now and December 25th. Just use the secret code "wildfire" when you checkout at my website. Get a great deal on these new resources for authors:


Bestseller Website Tutorial - Fiction and Non-Fiction versions
Marketing Plan Template for Authors - Fiction and Non-Fiction
How to Sell Books in Any Market - 5 hours of audio teaching


Remember, use "wildfire" in the discount code box when you checkout to get the discount. Applies to downloadable products only (PDF, Word, and mp3 files).


Merry Christmas and thanks for following my blog!





To receive Rob's Monday Morning Marketing Tips directly in your email inbox,
click here



© Rob Eagar 2011.
All rights reserved.






Friday, December 9, 2011

Guest Blog at Writers Digest - Set Realistic Expectations for Your Author Platform


I'm guest blogging today over at Writers Digest. Check out my article:

"Are We There Yet? Set Realistic Expectations for Your Author Platform"

Click here - http://goo.gl/RFvPj

Monday, December 5, 2011

Monday Morning Marketing Tip - December 5, 2011


Rob Eagar's Monday Morning Marketing Tip
is written to help authors, publishers, and organizations
spread their message like wildfire.


This week's focus:
In today's publishing climate, nothing influences a publisher's interest more than the strength of an author's platform. If publishers don't think you can help sell books, then they will pass on your proposal and choose someone else. This mentality applies to every author, including first-timers struggling to get a contract all the way to former bestsellers seeking to land a new deal.


The problem is that most authors spend over 80% of their time writing a manuscript but less than 20% preparing for how they'll market that book. Yet, it's the marketing part that usually determines whether or not a book ever gets published. Publishers gravitate to books that they believe will sell in the marketplace. How do you convince them that your book is worth the financial risk? Show them a solid marketing plan.


Marketing a book requires hard work, but the process itself is fairly straightforward. You can boil it down to three simple questions:


1. What the value of my book?
2. Who needs this value the most?
3. Where do readers who need my book's value congregate in large groups?



When you clarify answers to these questions, your marketing path will get clearer. However, your answers won't do you any good if don't put them into a plan of action. You can't market a book in a lackadaisical fashion and expect good results. It's one thing to know what to do, but another thing to execute effectively.


That's why there are numerous benefits to creating a written marketing plan. By taking the time to spell out what you're going to do, how you're going to do it, and when you're going to do it, you show publishers that you can be an promotional ally, rather than a financial risk. When publishers view you as an asset, then more likely they'll offer you a contract and open the doors to their promotional resources.



How do you write a powerful book marketing plan?
If you've never done it before, don't waste time trying to figure it out on your own. Get a copy of my new "Marketing Plan Templates for Fiction and Non-Fiction Authors." These concise, easy-to-use templates are only $19.99, and they'll guide you through each step of writing a professional-quality book marketing plan. When you finish, you'll have a powerful promotional tool that's sure to impress literary agents, editors, and publishers.

After all the time you invest in writing a manuscript, don't forget to invest in writing a marketing plan that insures your success.

Click here for more information about my expert guides for fiction and non-fiction authors.




New Educational Opportunities for Authors:
Mp3 Audio - How to Sell Books in Any Market: Click here
Tutorials - Build a Website Worthy of a Bestseller: Click here
Events - Writers Digest Author Conference in NYC - Jan. 20-22: Click here



To receive Rob's Monday Morning Marketing Tips directly in your email inbox,
click here



© Rob Eagar 2011.
All rights reserved.






Monday, November 28, 2011

Monday Morning Marketing Tip - November 28, 2011


Rob Eagar's Monday Morning Marketing Tip
is written to help authors, publishers, and organizations
spread their message like wildfire.


This week's focus:

The Top 10 Misconceptions
Authors Believe about Marketing



1. My publisher will market my book for me. That's wishful thinking. Unless you're an established bestselling author, publishers will do very little to market your book. You'll get placement in their catalogs and on their website, maybe a sales pitch to bookstore buyers. Otherwise, the media publicity, advertising campaigns, and book tours are reserved for the big dogs.


2. A good book doesn't need marketing. False. There are over a million new books produced each year in America, and thousands of great books get crowded out by the competition. Marketing is essential to making sure that the public knows your book exists. Out of sight...out of mind.


3. My website doesn't need to look professional. On the contrary, your website is a reflection of you. If your online presence looks shoddy, people won't take you seriously. But, if you appear reputable, you will attract more promotional opportunities to your book.


4. Social media is the best way to market a book. Not necessarily, because marketing success depends more on the content than the medium. Just because you have a Facebook or Twitter account doesn't mean you'll sell books. You must give people tangible value through those mediums before they'll become your "friend" or "follower."


5. Writing a self-published book means I'm a published author. Unless a legitimate publisher pays you money up-front (an advance) to write a book, you are not a published author. Self-publishing is growing in acceptance and quality, but it still doesn't mean you're published. To get published, pursue literary agents and acquisitions editors with a solid book proposal.


6. Amazon says my book is a bestseller. That's a misconception, because Amazon sales rankings only pertain to its own sales. They don't include other retailers. In addition, anyone can spike their way onto an Amazon bestseller list for a day or two by getting a bunch of friends to buy their book at the same time. That tactic doesn't qualify as a real bestseller.


7. Authors don't need a newsletter. That's bogus. When it comes time to promote a new book, you will desperately wish you had a large database of interested people who are ready to buy. Building a newsletter list over time is one of the best ways to position your book for success.


8. Authors just write books...they don't need to promote. Not anymore. There is very little money to be made writing books. To survive financially, authors must turn their intellectual property into multiple formats, such as audio, video, ebooks, speaking events, curriculum, movie rights, etc.


9. My book is for everyone. That's a nice fantasy, but it's a myth. Only the people who perceive the actual value of your book will buy it. If you want to sell more books, you must provide tangible benefit to a larger group of people.


10. I can figure out how to market a book by myself. Good luck. Learning how to market your book can be like trying to learn a foreign language. Your best bet is to take advice from an expert who has a real track record of success. You wouldn't take financial advice from someone in bankruptcy. Likewise, don't take marketing advice from someone who hasn't actually achieved the level of success you want to attain. That's why WildFire Marketing is a great place to fire up your educational process. Get started at: www.startawildfire.com


New Educational Opportunities for Authors:
Mp3 Audio - How to Sell Books in Any Market: Click here
Tutorials - Bestseller Website Template for Authors: Click here
Events - Writers Digest Author Conference in NYC - Jan. 20-22: Click here



To receive Rob's Monday Morning Marketing Tips directly in your email inbox,
click here



© Rob Eagar 2011.
All rights reserved.






Sunday, November 20, 2011

Monday Morning Marketing Tip - November 21, 2011


Rob Eagar's Monday Morning Marketing Tip
is written to help authors, publishers, and organizations
spread their message like wildfire.



This week's focus:
As winter approaches, snow begins to fall - which means fun activities, such as building a snowman or throwing snowballs at an unsuspecting spouse, kid, or neighbor. To build a snowman, you start by packing together a small ball of snow. Then, you roll the ball on the ground. As you maintain pressure while rolling, the ball will pick up snow as it rotates and builds momentum. The more you roll, the bigger it gets. If you continue rolling long enough, you will windup with a giant snowball.

The way you build a snowman is the same way you build an author platform. Usually, you start with a small group of readers. But, as you provide value through your marketing activities, your initial ball will start to attract more readers through word-of-mouth. If you stay consistent and "keep rolling," your ball of followers will build momentum and start to rapidly grow. Over time, you can windup with a giant platform.

Too many authors forget the "snowball" principle of marketing and wait too late to start promoting their new book. They ignore the need to begin marketing until 6 - 8 weeks before their books' launch date. By then, they feel overwhelmed with stress. Worse, there's not enough time to build the momentum necessary to rapidly expand their platform. It's like trying to build a huge snowball by only rolling it a few feet. You're going to be disappointed with the lack of growth.

Building a large platform takes time and effort. I tell the authors that I coach to start actively marketing a new book at least 6 months in advance. That length of time allows the momentum process to start early enough to get results. The sooner you get your snowball rolling, the more time you have to make it grow. Authors can market a book early by blogging on the topic, speaking on the subject, sending newsletters with updates, providing deep discounts for pre-orders, "leaking" sample chapters, etc. There's nothing wrong with getting people excited about a new book - even if they'll have to wait a few months. In fact, the sense of anticipation alone can be a key factor in building buzz among readers.

Don't let your book launch feel like you're getting run over by a snowball. Instead, use the snowball principle to your advantage. Start rolling early, stay consistent, and watch your platform grow.



-- By the way, I thought I'd practice what I preach and let you know that I have a new book coming out in May, 2012 with Writer's Digest publishing house called Sell Your Book Like Wildfire. Here's a sneak peek at the front cover. This book will be the definitive guide on book marketing and platform growth for authors. I hope you'll purchase a copy and tell your author network about it. As a thanks to my email subscribers, I'll be offering special discounts for those who pre-order early. Stay tuned for details.







To receive Rob's Monday Morning Marketing Tips directly in your email inbox,
click here



© Rob Eagar 2011.
All rights reserved.






Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Monday Morning Marketing Tip - November 14, 2011

Rob Eagar's Monday Morning Marketing Tip
is written to help authors, publishers, and organizations
spread their message like wildfire.

This week's focus:
Social networking is typically a passive approach to marketing, because you're at the mercy of other people deciding to visit your blog, "like" you on Facebook friend, "follow" you on Twitter, or subscribe to your YouTube channel, etc. The problem with this passive approach is that you're giving other people control of your promotional process. At any time, their online attention can be lured away by another author or book who grabs their interest. And, once people disappear, they rarely come back on their own.

That's why I recommend including proactive activities in your overall marketing plan. You want to take steps to reach your audience without waiting for them to reach you. How do you engage proactive marketing? Use the power of direct promotion, such as:

  • Send email or print newsletters
  • Speak publicly
  • Pursue and conduct media interviews
  • Line up book-signings
  • Write magazine articles
  • Reach out to book clubs


Effective marketing includes a balance of both passive and proactive activities. If you realize that you're being too passive, pick one of the ideas from the list above and make headway on it this week.





To receive Rob's Monday Morning Marketing Tips directly in your email inbox,
click here



© Rob Eagar 2011.
All rights reserved.



Monday, November 7, 2011

Monday Morning Marketing Tip - November 7, 2011


Rob Eagar's Monday Morning Marketing Tip
is written to help authors, publishers, and organizations
spread their message like wildfire.

This week's focus:
My wife and I recently went out to dinner to try a new restaurant that opened near our house. Instead of having a good experience, though, the restaurant failed to deliver on our expectations. For instance, it took a long time for our food to arrive, and even then, my entree was under-cooked and chewy. My wife's food was cold. In addition, the wait staff was inattentive and rarely came by our table to check on us. They seemed to disappear after we got our food.

Needless to say, my wife and I were dissatisfied with the experience. Fortunately, the manager stopped by our table to ask about our meal. We informed him of the situation, he sincerely apologized, and "comped" our meal for free. My wife and I were glad to leave without having to pay, and agreed that the restautant was not worth recommending to friends.

In the restaurant world, customers don't have to pay for their food until after they eat it. In the publishing world, however, it's the exact opposite. Readers have to pay for a book up-front, and hope that they have a good reading experience. If a book doesn't meet expectations, rarely can get their money back. They're stuck with a bad book. But, they sure won't spread good word of mouth.

As an author, never forget that your customer has to pay first in order to read your book. What if it was the other way around? What if readers could choose to pay only after they read your book? Would readers "send your book back to the kitchen" complaining that it was under-cooked or took too long to arrive at a good ending?

Authors have the luxury knowing that readers have to pay for books first. But, we cannot abuse this privilege. So, as your write your next book, keep this concept in the back of your mind. Just because people have to buy a book before reading it doesn't mean your off the hook. Put yourself in the position of a reader and ask if your book meets a reader's expectations. Or, would they request a refund on their reading experience?




To receive Rob's Monday Morning Marketing Tips directly in your email inbox,
click here



© Rob Eagar 2011.
All rights reserved.



Tuesday, November 1, 2011

Monday Morning Marketing Tip - October 31, 2011


Rob Eagar's Monday Morning Marketing Tip
is written to help authors, publishers, and organizations
spread their message like wildfire.


This week's focus:
Dolphins and whales are both air-breathing creatures who live in the ocean. Yet, they swim and behave in radically different ways. For example, sperm whales often descend into the depths of the sea and may not resurface to breathe for 35 - 90 minutes. This behavior can make whale-watching a frustrating endeavor for excited tourists hoping to catch a brief glimpse. In contrast, dolphins typically swim near the ocean's surface and tend to breathe every two minutes. This makes them easier to spot, and many dolphins will even chase alongside boats as tourists marvel at their speed and beauty.

In the literary world, don't be an author who swims like a whale, instead swim like a dolphin. For example, some authors disappear from their readers for several months, as they dive into the depths of their writer's cave to create their next book. This is a mistake, though, because it frustrates fans who want to stay in contact with that author. Readers begin to wonder when that author will resurface, and if it takes too long, they lose interest and move on to another author who's more accessible.

In contrast, wise authors swim like dolphins by regularly surfacing and staying in contact with their readers. They continue to work on their next book, but frequently "come up for air" through social media, newsletters, public appearances, media interviews, etc. They don't frustrate their readers by disappearing for long periods of time. They reward their readers with regular access and awareness. If you want your marketing to be more productive, examine how often you "surface for air" with your fans. Swim like a dolphin instead of submerging like a whale, and you'll catch more book sales.


To receive Rob's Monday Morning Marketing Tips directly in your email inbox,

click here



© Rob Eagar 2011.

All rights reserved.



Monday, October 24, 2011

Monday Morning Marketing Tip - October 24, 2011


Rob Eagar's Monday Morning Marketing Tip
is written to help authors, publishers, and organizations
spread their message like wildfire.


This week's focus:

This past weekend, college football fans were treated to an amazing game as Michigan State upset highly-ranked Wisconsin on the last play of regulation. As time expired, Michigan State's quarterback threw a last-ditch, 44-yard, "Hail Mary" pass that was bobbled by two players until receiver, Keith Nichol, caught the ball and crossed the goal line.


Some people called the desperate play a "lucky" win, and it was certainly a rare situation. However, Keith made an interesting comment in the post-game celebration interview. He said that Michigan State practiced that exact kind of last-second desperation play every week. In fact, they practice it so much that they have a name for the play called, "The Rocket."


What does a lucky, last-second catch in football have to do with marketing a book? There are times in life when you suddenly find yourself in a desperate "Hail Mary" situation. For example, you might randomly sit down next to an important person on the airplane. Someone may suddenly introduce you to a high-profile leader at a party. You may be asked to fill-in for a well-known speaker who cancels the day before. You might get asked to appear on a major radio or television show with little advance notice. Each of these situations has happened to several of my author clients.


The question is: are you prepared to handle those "Hail Mary" moment when they occur? Don't avoid the work and think you can just "wing it." Instead, do you practice reciting the value of your book? Do you have a powerful speech ready to give on short notice? Do you rehearse your sound bites so that you could give an effective interview if a TV producer called tomorrow?


Sometimes, the biggest marketing opportunities appear unannounced. If you're caught off guard, you won't be in a position to maximize those occasions. That's why it's important to continually prepare for those situations. For example, memorize the key value statements for your book. Rehearse answering media interview questions while driving in your car. Practice a new speech out loud by yourself until you own the material.


After the big win on Saturday, Michigan State's football coach, Mark Dantonio, said, "We always tell our players that they have to be ready, because you never know when your time will come." As an author, a major opportunity to market your book may be just around the corner. Will you be ready?



To receive Rob's Monday Morning Marketing Tips directly in your email inbox,

© Rob Eagar 2011. All rights reserved.

Monday, October 17, 2011

Monday Morning Marketing Tip - October 17, 2011


Rob Eagar's Monday Morning Marketing Tip
is written to help authors, publishers, and organizations
spread their message like wildfire.


This week's focus:
Social media is luring a lot of people to believe that marketing shouldn't cost them anything. "Free" is becoming the new promotional budget. The danger with this mindset is that it can lead to a position of complacency. Most people need to feel invested in an important activity in order to see it through to completion.

For example, one of my friends has a Ph.D in counseling and runs his own private practice. He's spent hundreds of hours helping people work through their most difficult life issues. Yet, he recently told me that his experience has shown that people who come to him for counseling on someone else's dime rarely make progress. That's right, people who receive free counseling rarely heed the advice of the counselor and experience positive change. That's because they have no money invested in the process to keep them engaged and accountable. In contrast, counselees who pay his full fee on their own are much more likely to participate in the counseling process and experience positive results, because they are personally invested.

This same dynamic applies to marketing. There's a tendency to let promotional efforts slip when you don't have any financial "skin in the game." If you're tired, distracted, or lazy, then it's easy to think, "I'm too busy to blog, Twitter, or FaceBook today. Besides, they're free, so it doesn't cost me anything." Whereas, if you've spent time creating a database of targeted leaders and hired a graphic artist to design a nice-looking newsletter, you're more likely to feel invested and follow-through on that activity.

Try this litmus test. If Facebook and Twitter started charging $100 a month, would you still use them? In addition, are you getting enough return on investment via social media marketing to justify the amount of time you expend? If yes, go forth and prosper. If not, then it's time to make a change and focus your marketing on other tactics, even if they cost money. The goal isn't activity, the goal is success.





To receive Rob's Monday Morning Marketing Tips sent directly to your email inbox,

© Rob Eagar 2011. All rights reserved.

Monday, October 10, 2011

Monday Morning Marketing Tip - October 10, 2011


Rob Eagar's Monday Morning Marketing Tip
is written to help authors, publishers, and organizations
spread their message like wildfire.


This week's focus:
One of the keys to selling books like wildfire is to get other people to act as a salesperson for you. Instead of marketing all by yourself, imagine hundreds of people singing your praises to the public. A great way to make this happen is by utilizing the power of success stories.

For example, Dave Ramsey, radio host and New York Times bestselling author of The Total Money Makeover, uses the power of success stories better than any author I know. Every Friday, Dave invites listeners to call his radio show, declare how much personal debt they use to carry, explain how Dave helped them get out of debt, and then scream with glee, "I'm debt free!" Dave congratulates them, plays a funny inspirational soundtrack, and you can't help but feel happy.


However, these joyful moments aren't just for the benefit of the caller. These emotional success stories also create a powerful marketing dynamic for Dave's books. Listeners are moved by hearing Dave's readers revel in their newfound financial freedom. If you're someone who happens to be in debt, these stories create a natural attraction to check out The Total Money Makeover.


You may not have a nationwide radio program like Dave Ramsey. Regardless, any author (fiction and non-fiction) can use the power of success stories as effective marketing tools. As you gather positive feedback from readers, share them regularly through your newsletter, website, blog, and social media pages. You could even create a regular focus on them like Dave does. You may not have people shouting, "I'm debt free!" Instead, your success stories can help people see your books and think, "I want to read!"





To receive Rob's Monday Morning Marketing Tips sent directly to your email inbox,

© Rob Eagar 2011. All rights reserved.

Monday, October 3, 2011

Monday Morning Marketing Tip - October 3, 2011


Rob Eagar's Monday Morning Marketing Tip
is written to help authors, publishers, and organizations
spread their message like wildfire.


This week's focus:
My wife loved reading the best-selling novel, "The Guernsey Literary and Potato Pie Society." The book's story is told through a compilation of letters between Londoners and residents of a British island once under German occupation during World War II. Random House, the book's publisher, setup a clever tool on the book's website called "Send a Letter." It's essentially an e-card service that enables fans of the book to embrace the romantic way of correspondence and spread interest about the book using vintage looking electronic stationary. I've always been a fan of e-cards and don't see enough authors taking advantage of this online marketing tool.

The "Potato Pie" website also offers other engaging word-of-mouth features, such as a detailed Google map of the real-life Guernsey island, recipes, a book club discussion guide, a video interview with the author, and a sweepstakes contest. Imagine how your author platform could grow if you place these types of tools in the hands of your readers.




New Workshop Opportunity:
Advanced Media Training for Authors
Saturday, November 5, 2011 - Atlanta, GA
Don't wait. Space is limited and registration closes Oct. 15th.
Click here for details.



To receive Rob's Monday Morning Marketing Tips sent directly to your email inbox,

© Rob Eagar 2011. All rights reserved.

Monday, September 26, 2011

Monday Morning Marketing Tip - September 26, 2011


Rob Eagar's Monday Morning Marketing Tip
is written to help authors, publishers, and organizations
spread their message like wildfire.


This week's focus:
Have you ever attended a music concert and seen T-shirts on sale for over $25? How can musicians get away with these ridiculously inflated prices? Emotion can trump logic when it comes to pricing. In other words, the emotional experience of a great performance makes people feel less concerned about price. Fans enjoyed the concert so much that they'll gladly pay an inflated charge to take home a souvenir to remember their good feelings. The greater the emotion, the less price is an issue.

As an author, you can enjoy this same dynamic. When readers hear you speak in public or meet you at a booksigning, they get to feel an emotional connection to you as an author. And, if they're fans of your material, that connection can run incredibly deep. For instance, look at the intense followings of bestsellers, such as J.K. Rowling, Malcolm Gladwell, or Stephenie Meyer.

Furthermore, getting a signed copy of your book can feel like a personal treasure to a fan. Therefore, price isn't top priority when most people visit your book table. Due to this fact, charge the full retail amount for individual copies of your book - especially if you sign them in-person.


New Workshop Opportunity:
Advanced Media Training for Authors
Saturday, November 5, 2011 - Atlanta, GA
Don't wait. Space is limited and registration closes Oct. 15th.
Click here for details.



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© Rob Eagar 2011. All rights reserved.

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

New Workshop - Advanced Media Training for Authors


One of the fastest ways to get exposure for your new book is through radio and TV interviews. Unfortunately, most publishers no longer setup media tours for their authors. Worse, typical PR firms charge $2,500 - $5,000 per month for their services - with no guarantee of success.  Why risk paying these outrageous prices when you can learn to setup media interviews on your own for free?

More importantly, landing media interviews doesn't mean you'll sell any books. You can't just show up and tell your story. Audiences don't care. Instead, you've got to learn how to drive listeners to take an interest in your book, or you'll windup wasting precious opportunities.

Rob Eagar, marketing coach to over 400 authors and author of the upcoming book, "Sell Books Like Wildfire," has taught dozens of his clients how to land media interviews and use that exposure to generate book sales. This one-day workshop will provide advanced-level, personalized instruction that will help you:
  • Write a press release that captivates media producers.
  • Prepare for a radio or TV interview with confidence.
  • Fearlessly interact with any kind of host.
  • Lead your listening audience towards buying your books.
  • Utilize these essential skills for the rest of your author career.
This will not be a boring, lecture style workshop. Rob will actively work with each attendee to write a professional press release, generate interesting questions and answers, control the interview discussion, and implement a book promotion strategy. You will complete important tasks and be ready for action by the time you leave. For those who are brave enough, Rob will video record a practice TV interview and critique it together.

Special bonus: All participants will receive a current database of over 25 radio, TV, and magazine producers as a helpful head-start to contact for interview requests.

Click here to get details and register today.

Note: Don't delay - a minimum of 5 people must register by October 15th for this event to take place. The group size will be capped at 10 attendees. 


"The advanced media training that I received from Rob Eagar was outstanding - thorough, practical, and behavior-changing. He prepared me to successfully tackle any kind of radio and TV interview, and helped lower my anxiety about managing unexpected questions. Most importantly, Rob showed me how to steer audiences towards making a purchase. Working with Rob helped my new book hit the CBA bestseller list in the first 30 days!"
Dr. Paul White
Co-author of The Five Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace



Monday, September 19, 2011

Monday Morning Marketing Tip - September 19, 2011


Rob Eagar's Monday Morning Marketing Tip
is written to help authors, publishers, and organizations
spread their message like wildfire.


This week's focus:
Facebook currently has over 750 million users worldwide, which makes it the largest social network in history and a powerful marketing tool for individuals and businesses. However, setting up a presence on Facebook doesn't replace the need for an effective website, whether it's personal or organizational. Even though Facebook is the dominant player on the Internet, social media will always be in a state of flux. New services will continue replace the current popular services that everyone loves. For instance, do you remember MySpace? Probably not. Yet, a short time ago, it used to be top dog. Today, it's the butt of online jokes. Likewise, the new Google+ network is already making efforts to compete with Facebook and steal away marketshare.

Therefore, you should maintain an Internet headquarters to market your message that isn't dependent on other services that could be here today and gone tomorrow. That's why a well-constructed website is so important. I'm not implying that you avoid using Facebook, Twitter, and the various online options available. You would be wise to use social networking to your advantage. But, not at the expense of neglecting to create your own website. A fancy Facebook page does not equal a website. People still prefer a one-stop-shop where they can go online to learn everything about your message. Social networking services can't offer the kind of flexibility and promotional power that comes with a website.




To receive Rob's Monday Morning Marketing Tips sent directly to your email inbox,

© Rob Eagar 2011. All rights reserved.

Monday, September 12, 2011

Monday Morning Marketing Tip - September 12, 2011


Rob Eagar's Monday Morning Marketing Tip
is written to help authors, publishers, and organizations
spread their message like wildfire.


This week's focus:
If you're an author who desires a larger platform, it won't happen by itself. You can't sit around waiting for Oprah or Good Morning America to call. Platform growth happens through steady action over time. If you feel like you're not growing fast enough, ask yourself at the end of every month, "Is my platform bigger in any way than it was 30 days ago?" Be honest and assess what's occurred. Use the following list to examine signs of growth:


  • How many new subscribers signed up for my newsletter in the last month?
  • How many new Twitter followers or Facebook fans joined my social network?
  • How many new speaking engagements or signings did I book?
  • How many new media interviews did I schedule?
  • How many new testimonials did I receive?
  • How many new people subscribed to my blog?
  • How many more website visitors did I receive this month versus last?


Are you putting effort each month into making these numbers grow and tracking the results? If not, then maybe that's why your platform is stuck in neutral. Fortunately, these are easy steps that you can take and great motivators to help you stay focused on reaching a larger audience for your book.




To receive Rob's Monday Morning Marketing Tips sent directly to your email inbox,

© Rob Eagar 2011. All rights reserved.